Our Mission

No Church document better explains and defends the Church’s timeless teaching about the family than Humanae Vitae. In this encyclical, promulgated on July 25, 1968, Pope Paul VI sends a saving message to a secular and suffering world. Blessed Paul VI explains how the spread of artificial contraception constitutes a poison that invites tyrants, both political and cultural, to attack and control the most intimate aspects of family life.
 
It is no wonder that Humanae Vitae has been fiercely attacked by the forces of the Dictatorship of Relativism since the day it appeared.
 
Yet Blessed Paul’s predictions have proven prophetic:
 
Brutal mandatory population control policies have been introduced in many countries, including India, China, and Peru. There has been a loss of respect for women and a general lowering of moral standards. There has been an increase in marital infidelity. In all these ways, the integrity of the family has been profoundly violated.
 
On this site The Humanae Vitae Project, sponsored by the Population Research Institute (pop.org), presents the most thorough and accurate history of artificial contraception, from its roots in the early twentieth century through the promulgation of Humanae Vitae in 1968. The brilliant work, authored by Professor Gonzalo Herranz of the University of Navarra, provides all you need to understand and defend God’s command to our first parents, “Be fruitful and multiply.” We offer below summaries of each chapter in English, each with a link to the full text Spanish text.

 
Read the full Humanae Vitae Encyclical here. Continue reading Our Mission

1. The birth of modern contraception.

Summary: Chapter 1 The Origins Of Modern Contraception: Three Terms And Three Attitudes This chapter considers the origin of three terms: contraception, prevenception, and birth control, which for decades have referred to the prevention of conception. Given the confusion that has prevailed, it is appropriate to clarify the history of how these words were born. Moreover, it is interesting to delve into a story which reveals how different the mentality and the aims of the pioneers of contraception control were. Continue reading 1. The birth of modern contraception.

2. Early contraception and its rejection of abortion

Summary: Chapter 2 The first contraception and its incompatibility with abortion In this chapter we will show how, in the mind of the creators of contraception, not only is it something distinct from abortion, but it is, by definition, incompatible with it. The theme is of great interest and relevance. The dominant idea in bioethics and medicine is, and has been for some decades, that there is an uninterrupted continuity between contraception and abortion. Continue reading 2. Early contraception and its rejection of abortion

3. The medical profession and contraception: from contempt to acceptance

Summary: Chapter 3 The Medical Profession Before Contraception: From Rejection To Acceptance I. Introduction: Institutional Contempt For Contraception In general, and until well into the twentieth century, institutional medicine adopted a negative attitude towards contraception. In contrast to their rejection by most doctors, the use of contraceptive methods spread among the general public, especially the well-off. The expansion of contraception use prompted the lucrative production and trade of contraceptive agents (some ineffective and potentially harmful). Continue reading 3. The medical profession and contraception: from contempt to acceptance

4. Catholic doctors and the AMA resolutions on contraception 

Summary: Chapter 4 Catholic Doctors and the Resolutions of the AMA on Contraception In this chapter we will study the relationship that the Catholic doctors of the United States maintained with the Report that the Committee for the Study of Contraceptive Practices issued in 1937, and the causes that originated the institutional Resolution that approved those practices. Continue reading 4. Catholic doctors and the AMA resolutions on contraception 

5. Jurists approve abortive contraception

Summary: Chapter V Jurists approve abortive contraception   I. The Model Penal Code of the American Institute of Law (ALI) The American Law Institute (ALI) is a private entity, founded in 1923 by lawyers, judges, and academics to study, clarify, and modernize American law at all levels. One of ALI’s most important project was the drafting of the Model Penal Code (MPC), which has had … Continue reading 5. Jurists approve abortive contraception

6. Changing words to change minds

Summary: Chapter 6 Changing words to change minds I. Introduction In the minds of its pioneers and in the opinion of the general public, contraception was, by definition, understood to mean the prevention of conception, understood as the prevention of fertilization. In fact, this understanding endured through the middle of the twentieth century. In the terms of social morality and professional ethics at the time, … Continue reading 6. Changing words to change minds

7. The Medico-Biological Aspect of the Papal Commission for the Study of the Problems of the Family, Population, and Birth Rate

Summary: Chapter VII The Medico-Biological Aspect of the Papal Commission for the Study of the Problems of the Family, Population, and Birth Rate   Nobody who has taken an interest in the ethical aspects of contraception can ignore the important role they played in the deliberations of the Papal Commission for the Study of the Problems of the Family, Population, and Birth Rate (CP), created … Continue reading 7. The Medico-Biological Aspect of the Papal Commission for the Study of the Problems of the Family, Population, and Birth Rate

8.1 Protagonists in the Shadows: Edward C. Hughes

Summary: Chapter VIII (I) Protagonists in the shade (I): Edward C. Hughes y Raymond Holden I. Edward C. Hughes and obstetric-gynecological terminology Edward C. Hughes was one of the creators in 1951 of the American Academy of Obstetrics and Gynecology, which soon after was renamed the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). He chaired the ACOG in the period 1962-1963, and became president of … Continue reading 8.1 Protagonists in the Shadows: Edward C. Hughes